Indiewire.com’s July Netflix top 10 Black movies

Selected Black Movies to Stream on Netflix Right Now from Indiewire.com

Indiewire.com has dedicated itself to scouring Netflix on a monthly basis to find interesting black movies. Their latest list on black movies picks on some less known but still very watchable titles. The complete list includes a gem from Spike Lee and also Ava Duvernay, you can check the complete article here

CUT THROAT CITY, from left: Shameik Moore, Demetrius Shipp Jr., 2020. © Well Go USA /Courtesy Everett Collection

Cut Throat City(2020)

As New Orleans struggles to recover from Hurricane Katrina, four friends decide to commit a daring heist out of desperation. This is RZA’s third feature film, and it’s a stunner. the film depicts is situated year after Hurricane Katrina, it gives the excitement that you’d expect from the heist genre while steeped in revelations about life in New Orleans.

Cninaza Uche in "Nigerian Prince"

Nigerian Prince (2019)

Nigerian Prince director Faraday Okoro challenges the mainstream narrative in Nigerian filmmaking, which has been demonized as Nollywood. Eze (Antonio J. Bell) is a surly American adolescent who travels to Lagos, Nigeria’s enormous capital, to spend four weeks with his aunt. At least that’s what he thought. As innocent as it seems, his mother flew him to Nigeria so he could learn about his Nigerian roots. Eze soon discovers he isn’t just a guest

Middle of Nowhere (2012)

Middle of Nowhere, Ava DuVernay’s second film before she became a star, tells the storey of an African-American woman’s battle to maintain her marriage and identity when her husband is imprisoned. Emayatzy Corinealdi plays Ruby, a woman who stands by her lover no matter what (Omari Hardwick). As a result, the viewer is able to connect with her situation more easily because she’s feisty when she needs to be, but not theatrical. Introspective and alone, it builds slowly and steadily, gaining strength (and becoming better as it goes). A mature tribute to adulthood when we become self-reliant and responsible for our decisions and their consequences, and accept who and/or what we are with warts and all.

High Flying Bird (2019)

Erick Scott, a rookie basketball player with an agent named Ray Burke, is presented with an exciting and controversial business opportunity during an NBA lockout. High Flying Bird is about taking action to help yourself succeed. Roger Ebert describes it as is razor-sharp, exhibiting extensive research into the difficulties and concerns that define the modern athlete while yet remembering to be wickedly funny. You’ll learn that professional sports is not all that’s it’s painted out to be

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