Tomsguide.com listing the best black movies

The best Black movies and where to watch them online

Tomsguide.com which is better known for technology has provided an interesting list of black movies spanning sports, comedy, real-life, and fiction. There is literally something for everyone in this list which you can find here

Judas and the Black Messiah

Lakeith Stanfield’s performance as William O’Neal (the Judas to Hampton’s Black Messiah) is just as significant as Daniel Kaluuya’s portrayal of Black Panther Party leader Fred Hampton, which gained him plaudits – and an Oscar. Stanfield’s performance is troubling, leaving you with many unanswered concerns about why he left Hampton and unwilling to explain it. A Fred Hampton biography had been in the works for some years, with the Lucas brothers and Will Berson each writing and submitting screenplays since 2014. With Hampton’s family’s blessing, the group came together in 2019, and production began in Ohio that fall.

Love Jones

This a romantic enjoyable movie, Nina Mosely (Nia Long), a photographer, is trying to figure out whether their relationship is casual or serious. Theodore Witcher’s film contains multi-layered African-American characters that show that even people we care about can have flaws. Tate and Long have magnetic chemistry, and it’s great to see them on screen together.

The Best Man

The Best Man presents unique viewpoints on inter-dimensional character connections, and it isn’t afraid to confront and reveal the characters’ flaws. The film is both amusing and heartwarming, it is about college friends getting together for a weekend wedding and discovering new and old truths about themselves. The ensemble cast is superb (including Taye Diggs, Morris Chestnut, Terrance Howard, Harold Perrineau, Nia Long, and Sanaa Lathan), and the picture has a great blend of humorous and dramatic moments.

Uncorked

Prentice Petty’s film illustrates a father’s wrath when his son refuses to join the family’s two-generation company. Uncorked highlights the challenges faced by a young man who rejects his father’s desires by following his passion. Elijah (Momoudou Athie) wants to be a sommelier, but his father, Louis (Courtney Vance), wants him to work for his family’s Memphis barbeque business. The back-and-forth chat between the father and kid is a fantastic mix of stress and amusement.

If Beale Street Could Talk

Tish Rivers (Kiki Layne) and Alonzo “Fonny” Hunt (Stephan James) are engaged and expecting a child in early 1970s Harlem, but their plans are put on hold when Fonny is incarcerated for a crime he didn’t commit. As Rivers fights to clear Hunt, the close family dynamic is heartwarming. If Beale Street Could Talk is flawless in every detail. It has become an instant classic romantic drama.

Devil in a Blue Dress

The film Devil In A Blue Dress, based on Walter Mosely’s novel, is a superb example of good narrative. Easy Rawlins (Denzel Washington) is an unemployed Black World War II veteran with few career prospects in late 1940s Los Angeles. Easy meets DeWitt Albright (Tom Sizemore) in a bar, a strange white man looking for someone to look into the disappearance of a missing white woman named Daphne Monet (Jennifer Beals), whom he believes is hiding out in one of the city’s Black jazz clubs. Easy accepts the work since he is short on cash and must make housing payments, but he soon finds himself in over his head.

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